Spanish Wine

Wines to Pair with the NBA Finals: 2018 Edition

NBA Finals Oakland. One of my favorite versions of the bustling metropolis, the ever-evolving, the rapidly extravagant city that (as of now) hosts the 5 time Champion Golden State Warriors. Even Ice Cube was at the Lake Chalet in Oakland this morning, signaling that everyone wants a piece of this amazing city and that Today will in fact, be a Good Day. Now without further ado…

Wines to Pair with the 2018 NBA Finals.

China Klay

I’ve heard it said, the most dependable, possibly the best player on the Warriors squad is “China Klay.” After letting it all hang out over his two week stint China this summer, Klay Thompson taught the world what it’s like to ‘do you’, and absolutely slay. And while I hope Klay refrains from the Dim Sum over the next few weeks, I feel perfectly comfortable watching the Finals with a batch of soup dumplings and a bottle of Celler La Salada ‘Roig Boig.’ Roig Boig is a hodge podge of indigenous, nearly extinct varieties from the Penedès region of Spain. Farmed and vinified organically, made in the Petillant style and so delicious with dumplings I’m surprised China Klay wasn’t spraying it all over the Rockets Locker room.

The Steph Shimmy

I named our sherry flight at Bellota after Steph Curry, so it only makes sense to drink the sherry while we watch our boy do the shimmy. For a delicious bottle of briny Manzanilla, look to Alexander Jules ‘8/41.’ Alexander Russan is an importer, a winemaker and an extremely proficient sherry barrel selector. He scours the Sherry Triangle for exceptional sherry barrels, buys them from the sherry house solera and bottles them for my (and your) consumption. (Should any of these words confuse you, reread my previous Sherry blog.) We have this wine by the glass at Bellota so be sure to quaff some down bar-side before a game.

The Hamptons 5

I have high hopes for Iguadala’s return, so when the Hampton’s Five takes the court this Finals, let’s all get fancy. I myself have never been to the Hamptons, but were I to go to this popular seaside celeb hangout, I’d take a delicious bottle of Envínate ‘Palo Blanco.’ The Palo Blanco is made from 100 year old vine Listan Blanco, grown of the steep hillsides of Tenerife, Las Canarias. It’s a relatively rare wine, more thoughtful than most celebrity types and such a great example of terruño you may not even notice Kanye West walking past you. Rumor has it, it may even be the wine they drank when seducing Durant into playing with us. We may never know.

The LeBron Show

Fine fine, LeBron James is kind of an anomaly. And after four finals and a number of Christmases together, he knows how to show off for the Warriors. When its time to sit back and watch him get crazy, I’ll be sipping on a grippy, muscular glass of 2013 Clos Martinet from the Priorat. Dark fruit, tobacco and slate to answer back LeBron’s uncanny ability to put up so many points. Hopefully my dad will have grilled up a steak and my dog will have readied her earmuffs.

The Big Win

Whether LeBron gets crazy or not, I’ve got to count on another Oakland win. For this year’s festivities, I’m drinking a bottle of Clos Lentiscus ‘Xarel.lo Xpressió.’ Winemaker, Manel Avinyó adds rosemary honey from the estate’s Bee Farm to start the secondary fermentation- giving the wine a creamy, bees-waxy flavor and texture. White flowers, jasmine, rocky terruño, herbs and a delicious nuttiness make up the flavor components of this champagne style sparkler. Last year I was in Spain when we won, silently crying and yelling from my wonderful accommodations with my friends at Succés Vinícola. This year, I plan on popping the top off this sucker right here in Oakland- just as soon as I see Steph kissing that Larry O’Brien Trophy. GO DUBS!!!

 

PS- All of these wines are on the wine list at Bellota, which is where I work now, which I swear we’ll talk about as soon as I get time. I’ve missed you.

 

Blogged At: Bellota SF

Soundtrack: (Spotify Radio)- Flow with it (You Got Me Feeling Like)

Advertisements

Lessons from an Airport

Airports. I’m tired of crying in them. I’m tired of being in them, really. This is the second time I’ve cried in the Santiago de Compostela Airport. This time it’s my fault. It’s raining. I look to my left, another girl is crying. She has someone holding her, though, so it’s probably for different reasons.

All the men in Galicia wear the same cologne.

This is it, the last leg of my trip. I’m headed to Barcelona for three more days and then home. What have I learned? I know how better to drink Gintonics. I know how to get gas, to order food. I can take a coffee, drive a car, kill roaches in a hotel room, buy groceries. I almost learned how to cook an octopus. Could I do all of that already?

In the last two days, though, I’ve learned 4 new varietals, I drank one of them out of a barrel. Yesterday I drank Ferrol out of a barrel with Luis Rodriguez. On Monday I tasted the wine I helped make last year at Fazenda Prádio. Last week I drank Txakoli like a champion and the week before I drank the wines of one of the funniest, foul-mouthed men I’ve met since my Grandma Jan. I’ve stained my hands making Ratafia. I’ve learned about mildew, about vine training, about planting vines on volcanoes. I’ve learned about sulfites and no sulfites and wind and drought. I’ve learned about solera systems, about making barrels and about aging in amphorae. About sacrifice and loss and replanting for the good of the region.

When I get home I’ll learn how to cook that octopus.

Spain is an incredible place. All of the people I’ve talked to, the winemakers I’ve met- each with different ideas but all with the same goal in mind. There is so much happening here I don’t know how many blog posts it will take to relay the message. I hope I’m the right person to do it. I hope a little Picasso and a stroll through El Born will give me inspiration to pull it all together. Otherwise, what the fuck was I doing here?

I think next I will learn how not to cry in airports. It’s so dramatic, really. Wildly unnecessary. A solid waste of time when I could be enjoying a Gintonic.

Perhaps I’ll start that lesson next time. See you soon, friends.

Blogged At: Santiago de Compostela Airport, Galica

Soundtrack: Tensnake 58 BPM

Conca de Barberà

The Conca de Barberà is an energetic, spunky little wine region that sits respectfully amongst some of Catalunya’s more prominent players. The surrounding superstar regions of Penedés, Priorat, Costers de Segre and the Montsant get most of the credit, but the wines coming out of Conca de Barberà are proving major contenders. Very little wine actually leaves the region, as most of the grapes are sold to the bigger guys or used make Cava, but the wines that do make their way to the great USA are consistently on point and are often natural or biodynamic. (more…)

It rains in Spain…

Look friends, it rains in Spain. In fact in Ribeira Sacra, Galicia it’s going to rain this Thursday. I state this only because I think when people consider Spanish wine they envision this dry, hot climate where red grapes roast in the sun and where acidity goes to die. And sure, there are some big ass wines that reek of oak and come in bottles that I can barely bench press. But in places like Ribeira Sacra, where it’s going to rain this Thursday, there are wines being made with the panache of Pinot Noir, and the elegance of a Steph Curry layup. And maybe it’s because Galicia is the most beautiful place I’ve ever seen, or because in Terra Alta, Catalunya they are producing the best Garnatxa Blanca I’ve ever tasted; maybe it’s just because I want to talk about Steph Curry, but I’m writing this blog and making it my job to drop all the science I possibly can about Spanish wine on anyone who will listen. I’ll tell you what it is, how it was made, where to get it and why it’s so gosh darn delicious. All you have to do is read about it…and drink it up. Vale!!?

 

Blogged at: Mom and Dad’s. Oakland, CA

Soundtrack: Mac Dre, It’s Raining Game